AW: [Desktop_printing] Role of CUPS and error handling

Michael Sweet mike at easysw.com
Mon Apr 3 18:32:50 PDT 2006


Robert L Krawitz wrote:
> ...
> If we provide interfaces and extensions like this so that "advanced"
> applications can implement their own extended print dialogs, then
> every such application is likely to have its own dialog that behaves
> subtly differently.  I cannot see how that could possibly be any
> better for anyone -- application developers, library developers, or
> users -- than a common dialog.  The key is to implement them in a way
> that's minimally confusing to people who don't need the extensions
> while still allowing experts to have access to them.

I do agree that a common dialog is a good thing, and I think when
applications support a paged/preview view of their documents (or
whatever it is you are manipulating) the common dialog *is*
sufficient.

That said, there are applications (typically the "professional"
ones...) which do not follow this model.  On the Mac you get a
semi-standard print dialog with a separate application-specific
option pane.  On Windows, you get a custom print dialog with a
"setup" button which displays one of the two standard print dialogs
with a button that confusingly says "Print" on it (but doesn't
print, it just returns control back to the application's print
dialog).

Take what you will from this...

> ...
> Now, as for specific use cases for needing extreme color accuracy and
> precision when printing from a word processor:
> 
> 1) A photographer creating an advertising brochure for her business.
>    She wants samples of her work to be reproduced with extreme
>    fidelity, on glossy photo paper, in addition to properly set text.
> 
>    Perhaps said photographer also wants to mail this brochure to a
>    variety of clients.  Rather than using mailing labels on lower
>    quality paper, she wants to print the mailing label on each
>    brochure.  Therefore, she needs the mail merge capabilities of a
>    word processor.

OK, my gut thinks this is a bogus use scenario - if quality is an
issue, you won't mail your photo brochures printed on an inkjet
printer without putting them in an envelope, otherwise they *will*
get destroyed on the way to your potential clients.  If they are in
an envelope, then you won't be printing the address on the brochure...

> 2) An graphic artist producing an album for a client, with a mixture
>    of text, graphics, and images.  For example, a catalog for a swanky
>    auction might include photographs of the objects for sale along
>    with textual descriptions of the items, as well as the auction
>    house logo.

It is unlikely that you'd use a word processor for this - word
processors typically only provide limited layout capabilities and
are not optimized for documents with large numbers of high-resolution
images.  On Windows or MacOS you'd probably use InDesign or Quark to
do the layout, both of which are considered to be "pro" apps.

-- 
______________________________________________________________________
Michael Sweet, Easy Software Products           mike at easysw dot com
Internet Printing and Publishing Software        http://www.easysw.com



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